Hand-Painted Icon of Jesus Christ Pantocrator

Hand-Painted Icon of Jesus Christ Pantocrator
Product Code: P1533 [ custom-made ]
Price: $69.95
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PRODUCT INCLUDES >>>

  • a hand-painted tempera-on-wood reproduction of the original icon
  • available in three sizes: 4" x 5 1/8" (small), 6 2/3" x 8 2/3" (medium) and 8 1/4" x 11" (large)

QUOTATIONS >>>

"In Christian iconography, Christ Pantocrator is a specific depiction of Christ. Pantocrator or Pantokrator (Greek: Χριστὸς Παντοκράτωρ) is, used in this context, a translation of one of many names of God in Judaism. The most common translation of Pantocrator is "Almighty" or "All-powerful". In this understanding, Pantokrator is a compound word formed from the Greek words πᾶς, pas (GEN παντός pantos), i.e. "all" and κράτος, kratos, i.e. "strength", "might", "power". This is often understood in terms of potential power; i.e., ability to do anything, omnipotence. Another, more literal translation is "Ruler of All" or, less literally, "Sustainer of the World". In this understanding, Pantokrator is a compound word formed from the Greek for "all" and the verb meaning "To accomplish something" or "to sustain something" (κρατεῖν, kratein). This translation speaks more to God's actual power; i.e., God does everything (as opposed to God can do everything). The Pantokrator, largely an Eastern Orthodox or Eastern Catholic theological conception, is less common by that name in Western (Roman) Catholicism and largely unknown to most Protestants. In the West the equivalent image in art is known as Christ in Majesty, which developed a rather different iconography. Christ Pantocrator has come to suggest Christ as a mild but stern, all-powerful judge of humanity.
 
The image of Christ Pantocrator was one of the first images of Christ developed in the Early Christian Church and remains a central icon of the Eastern Orthodox Church. The icon, traditionally half-length when in a semi-dome, which became adopted for panel icons also, depicts Christ fully frontal with a somewhat melancholy and stern aspect, with the right hand raised in blessing or, in the early encaustic panel at Saint Catherine's Monastery, the conventional rhetorical gesture that represents teaching. The left hand holds a closed book with a richly decorated cover featuring the Cross, representing the Gospels. Christ is bearded, his brown hair centrally parted, and his head is surrounded by a halo. The icon is usually shown against a gold background comparable to the gilded grounds of mosaic depictions of the Christian emperors."
-- Source: WikipediA

"We reverence thy spotless icon, O gracious Lord,
and ask forgiveness of our transgressions, O Christ our God:
for of thine own good will thou wast pleased
to ascend the Cross in the flesh,
that thou mightest deliver from bondage
to the enemy those whom thou hadst fashioned.
Wherefore, we cry aloud unto Thee:
Thou hast filled all things with joy,
O our Savior, for Thou didst come to save the world."

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